16:38 WBC heavyweight champion Deontay Wilder (US) has called out Kiwi Joseph Parker after beating Gerald Washington with a 5th round knockout.

16:27 National list MP Paul Foster-Bell will stand down at the election after pulling out of the candidate selection race for Wellington Central.

16:25 A Give-a-little page has been set up to help the family of New Zealander Sam Kerr who has died in an avalanche in Japan.

16:24 1080 opponents are furious that the Government is taking control of the poison. Currently, regional councils make their own rules over 1080 use.

15:17 A 20-year-old French tourist is recovering after being rescued from the bottom of a steep ravine in Fiordland.

Fri, 13 Apr 2012

VIDEO: Why don't those stars move?

Stars in the sky will typically appear to rise and set as the Earth turns. If you look closely at the above time-lapse movie, however, there are points of light that appear stationary. These objects are not stars but human-launched robotic spacecraft that remain fixed high above the Earth's equator. Called geostationary satellites, they don't fall down because they do orbit the Earth -- they just orbit at exactly the same speed that the Earth rotates. The orbital distance where this is possible is much farther than the International Space Station but much closer than the Moon. The video was taken from one of the highest revolving restaurants in the world located on the Mittelallalin in the Swiss Alps. An even closer inspection will show that the geostationary satellites flash with glints of reflected sunlight. The satellites also all appear on a single line - actually the projection of the Earth's equator onto the sky.

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